Treasurer: Dr. Paul Dalrymple

Paul (R) and Ed Hillary, 1958

Paul (R) and Ed Hillary, 1958

By education a geographer (BS Clark University, MS Syracuse Univ, PhD, Boston University)  By experience a physical geographer who in life worked as the resident observer at Harvard University’s Blue Hill Observatory,  as acloud observer at the Mt. Washington NH Observatory, as a meteorologist with the US Weather Bureau’s North Atlantic Weather Project, as a physical oceanographer with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, working on the ALBATROSS III, studying the North Atlantic’s Gulf Stream System, as a glacial meteorologist at Dye II Station on the Greenland Ice Sheet, as a dropsonde observer on a research aircraft participating in the International Indian Ocean Expedition, as the micrometeorologist at Little America V in 1957, as the micrometeorologist at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in 1958,  as At-Home micrometeological project manager, Plateau Station, Antarctica, 1966-68as project manager of Project TREND (Tropical Environmental Data) in Thailand, as the Dept of Army’s representative on Intergovernmental Study on Climate and Food at National War College, Ft. McNair, as the DoD representative on the drafting of the first US National Climate Plan.  But most of Paul's government career wasspent with the Quartermaster Corps Research and Development Center in Natick, Massachusetts and the Engineer Topographic Laboratory at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia.

Paul probably set a record for attending various Boston area colleges, as at one time he attended classes at Boston College, Harvard University, Northeastern University, as well as the aforementioned Boston University, plus the University of New Hampshire!

During World War II, Paul served in the infantry as a rifleman, 94th Infantry Division, until captured by the Germans in the Battle of the Bulge.

Paul on Little America V Met Tower

Paul on Little America V Met Tower

 

Paul received the New England Civil Servant of the Year award in 1960 and the Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1959 (third highest award given by the Dept of Army). He also got a medal from the USSR for his research in Antarctica and medal from NSF for just going to Antarctica. Mt. Dalrymple, a majestic 11,000 foot peak in the Sentinels Range of the Ellsworth Mountains is named in honor of Paul.

Paul joined the Antarctican Society in 1975.  From 1978 to the present he has served the Society in various capacities, with the main one being the editor of its Newsletters for past thirty years.  The Antarctican Society occupies nearly all of his spare time, as its base of operations is in his home in Port Clyde, Maine, where its Newsletter is not only produced but disseminated throughout the world. Another labor of love is serving as the area's Cooperative Weather Observer for the National Weather Service